What Is The Scariest Part of Skydiving?

January 6, 2019 by Skydive California

It seems safe to say most people enjoy a little bit of a thrill. After all, the routine of the day to day tends to be a little…dare we say it…blasé. In order to shake off the dust of that apathetic lull, you’ve got to seek out things that cause the flicker of a quickened pulse and spark your nerves. It’s probably that little urge that led you here and one of the reasons you are looking into skydiving.

Simple honesty is important. So, let’s get down to brass tacks. When we are asked, is skydiving scary? We won’t lie. In a way, yes, it certainly is. But skydiving is not scary for the reasons you are probably thinking. Time and time again we’ve seen it proved, the scariest part of skydiving is actually the anticipation of what’s to come! It’s the big bad unknown that is actually troublesome. So, let us help you dissipate some of that fear. Here’s what you’re in for.

The Plane Ride

Tandem Skydiving Students in Airplane

Your skydiving experience is composed of several parts. The first, and frankly, one of the more nerve-wracking bits of a skydive, is the plane ride to altitude. At Skydive California, we try to keep you comfortable and get this part out of the way as quickly as possible. Since there’s no other way to get you to the height you need to skydive, a plane ride is unavoidable, but there is a way to keep your anxiety in check. Really, the scariest part of skydiving is entirely manageable with the slightest shift in perception.  On the way to altitude, see your fear for what it is: a challenge to overcome. This part won’t take that long, and rest assured, your anxiety is going to be higher as you anticipate the skydive. You’ll be having so much fun during the jump, you’ll wonder what all the fear was for!

The Exit

Alright, you made it through the plane ride to altitude. It’s time. The door opens, your skin tingles from the brisk feel of the air at 13,000ft, and if it wasn’t before, it’s real now! This part of the skydive lasts roughly three seconds. The hardest part is stepping up. This is the final push. Listen to the voice that says go forward. If you can do this, you can do anything. The scariest part of skydiving, the wait, is finally over.

Ready. Set. Go.

Tandem Skydiving Student and Instructor Exiting Plane

Freefall

There’s a split second when you leave the door of the aircraft where you may wonder what in the world you’re doing, but there’s no going back. That moment of surrender is what you’ve been waiting for: all your pent-up energy is finally released. Your worries are cast to the wind. As you experience the near weightlessness of freefall, suspended above Northern California, breathe and take it all in. It gets better. There’s even more to come.

Happy Tandem Skydiving Student in Freefall

The Canopy Ride

After about 60 seconds of freefalling at 120mph, it’s time to enjoy the next part of your skydive: the canopy ride. When it’s time, your instructor will deploy the parachute. From here, you’ll experience a quiet view from a vantage point unlike any you’ve had before. If you like, your instructor can make this journey to the ground a time to reflect and soak in the peaceful feeling of a gentle canopy ride. If you’re not ready for the rush to be over, your instructor can make the canopy ride an exciting continuation of freefall with spirals and turns.

The Landing

It’s time to get your feet back to the ground. As you come in for landing, listen to your instructor! Once you’ve landed, hoop, holler, wave to your friends and family, and maybe even do it again! After making the leap, when you’re asked “is skydiving scary?”, you’ll know just what to tell them: the scariest part of skydiving was all in your head.

Tandem Skydiving Students and Instructors after landing

Still scared? It’s okay. Even seasoned skydiving pros feel the flutter of butterflies in their stomach from time to time. It’s a completely natural feeling. Let us help you face it. We’ve figured out plenty of ways to help you get past your fear and are more than happy to help!

Related Article: 4 Tips to Overcome Skydiving Anxiety